World Mental Health Day

Happy World Mental Health Day. Today is a more important day than ever to remember those who lost their battle, celebrate those who found the strength to persevere, and remind anyone who is still struggling that they are so much more than their illness.

When I was very sick, I relied on my mental illness. I was convinced that without it, I was nobody. Now that I’m in a better place, however, I realize how completely wrong I was. Mental illness destroyed my relationships with my family and friends, stripped away everything I once enjoyed, and made me feel worthless and unwanted to the point where I wanted to die. 

But with a lot of therapy and support, after three years of enduring constant mental and emotional torment, I was able to commit to recovery. If you or anyone you know may be struggling with mental illness, please do not hesitate to seek help. Whether or not you believe it now, YOU ARE ENOUGH.

Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

Dealing with Negative Reviews

I knew when I decided to self-publish a book that negative reviews would be inevitable. I processed it, I accepted it, I prepared for it . . . and it still sucks. 

Earlier today, I received a review on Goodreads that claimed the psych ward in Changing Ways is unrealistic because Grace had “far too many opportunities to get away with not eating.” A large part of me was tempted to leave a comment rebutting this reviewer’s remark. After all, Grace’s stay at CTC is entirely based on my own experiences with psych wards, many of which were utterly incompetent when it came to eating disorders. Like Grace, at six of my seven inpatient admissions, I too manipulated the system and consequently lost a startling amount of weight. 

I wanted to say this. But I didn’t.

I knew it wouldn’t matter. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion because everyone sees things a little differently. And that’s what makes humans so fantastic. I don’t expect every person who reads Changing Ways to like it. It tackles a subject many people are uncomfortable with and is written with a strong teen voice, something others may find annoying or unsophisticated (yes, I’ve heard both of these).

I’m proud of my book, and at the end of the day, that’s all that really matters. If I had let my fear of criticism get the best of me, I never would have published Changing Ways. I wouldn’t have the opportunity to share my story, to speak my truth. But I do, and that alone makes every biased, hurtful, sucky review worthwhile.

life that’s dominated by fear is a life I do not want to live. 

Coping with SAD

Fall is undeniably one of the most beautiful times of the year, but for someone like me, who suffers from Season Affective Disorder, it’s also one of the most difficult. As the days become shorter and the temperature drops, I begin to feel sad, tired, and lack motivation to do even the simplest of things, like getting out of bed or dressing nicely. It’s because of this that the majority of my winter clothing comprises of sweats.

I began struggling with SAD when I was in the eighth grade. Although it’s been five years since I hit my lowest weight, four since my first hospital admission, and three since I was finally able to commit to recovery, many of the bad memories I associate with fall are so vivid, they might as well have happened yesterday. And while there are still times when I feel overwhelmed or lose hopeas the years progressed, I’ve discovered several coping mechanisms in order to prevent SAD from derailing my recovery:

1. My lightbox. Lightboxes mimic sunlight to evoke a chemical change in my brain, which lifts my mood and alleviates other symptoms brought on by SAD. I usually spend ten-to-fifteen minutes under my lightbox while I eat breakfast. The morning is the best time, as lightboxes can disrupt sleep if they’re used too late in the day.

2. Focusing on the positive. I know it sounds cliche, but it’s easy to forget the progress I’ve made when I’m down. That’s why, whenever I feel my mood beginning to dip, I take a moment to reflect on how far I’ve come over the past few years and another to remind myself of how shitty it would be to return to that dark, miserable place.

3. Being with people. For me, nighttime is when my depression is the most intense. That’s why in the evening, I hang out in a central location or watch TV with my family until I’m psychically and mentally exhausted. That way, when I crawl into my bed, I don’t have the energy to think negative thoughts or remember unpleasant times.

4. Doing fun stuff. It’s really easy when I’m feeling down to lack motivation to do much of anything. I used to sleep to escape the pain, but now I force myself to engage in activities that bring me joy, like board games or funny YouTube videos or playing with my cats.

5. Putting my health first. This should be a no-brainer, but for many people (including myself) it’s easy to get caught up in the constant hubbub of school, work, sports, etc. That said, if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that nothing else matters when I’m not well. 

Remember; how you let SAD affect you is (mostly) in your hands. There are dozens of other coping skills I didn’t mention, but in order for them to work, you must commit to using them every day as best you can. YOU have the power.

If you think you have SAD or want to learn more, click here

First Book Talk

On Saturday, September 29th at 1:00, Book Club Bookstore and More will be hosting my first book talk. I’m so excited (and a little anxious) to finally have a platform to share my story. The past five years of my life have been a mix of terrifying, insightful, unexpected, and at times, downright crazy. I’ve had days when I couldn’t get out of bed, then others when I embraced the world with open arms. I’ve sobbed for hours on end. I’ve laughed until my stomach hurt. I’ve wanted to die. I’ve fought tooth-and-nail to be alive.

When I began writing Changing Ways one year ago, I had no idea where it would take me–and I still don’t, not really. That said, I’m ready to start exploring this next chapter of my life. The future is an open door . . . and so is Book Club Bookstore and More. On Saturday, September 29th. At 1:00. For more details, click here.

Now all I have to do is figure out what the hell I’m going to say.

CHANGING WAYS

It’s happening!!! My debut novel Changing Ways is officially available for purchase on Amazon This is a huge accomplishment for me and an even larger step forward in my recovery. Four years ago, I couldn’t imagine living today, much less achieving my goal of becoming a published author, and now that I have, I’ve never been happier to be alive. This is a dream come true, and I’m so excited to share it with each and every one of you.